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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the balance is right in so many areas of the european union has legislated, including environment, social affairs and crime. nothing should be off the table. my fourth principle of democratic accountability. we need to have a bigger and more significant role for national powers. there is not parliaments that will remain the true source of legitimacy. it is angela merkel has to answer to the great parliament that antonio samaras has to pass measures and i must account on the e.u. budget negotiations come to safeguarding single market. they still and proper respect even fear it to national leaders that we need to recognize that properly on the way the e.u. does business. this principle is fearless. whatever the abridgment are enacted for the euro zone, they must work fairly for those countries inside it or outside it. that will be of particular importance to britain. we are not going to join the single currency, that there is no overwhelming economic region should share the same boundary anymore then the single market. our ability to help set its rules as the principal reason for membership
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
that let you do what you do and, live in this environment. bill: there he is. speaking like an american, huh? like that. mickelson's net worth is $180 million. the guy ain't hurting but tiger woods says mickelson was right about taxes especially in california and says high taxes was why woods moved out of the california and moved to florida with no state income tax in the first place. both of these guys are from california. mickelson made his hometown there for, he was born and raised in san diego. for him to leave the state is a big, big deal. if you're taking home 37 cents on the dollar, 47 cents on the dollar, i think it is okay to speak up. martha: it is something for all americans to give some thought to. bill: why did he apologize? martha: i don't know why he apologized, the backlash against it, saying is it right for any american to spend 63 cents of their dollar, of every dollar they make and hand it over to the government? bill: state, county, federal. martha: so much discussion about fair share and people, people obviously, some people are outraged. he can afford it. that is n
's important to them to be able to create a safe environment for this gentlemen to be able to tell his story. they know heights a complicated story and they know it will take time. they want to earn his trust and let him know that they are his voice to the outside world. martha: very interesting. and we know that he's in a bunker. he has been sort of fortifying and planning this place for quite some time. the neighbors were aware that he was building this underground there, you know, but you need to obviously appeal to his sense of this child, and that this child has nothing to do with whatever it is that is bothering him, right? >> well, yeah, i mean he feels -- for whatever reason he feels attacked, he feels very defensive about what is going on around him. everything that he's done is clearly to protect himself. the child is not a threat to him, and for whatever reason it was that he took this child it's part of his mechanism to try and protect himself. so he shouldn't see this child as a threat, and he's probably -- the negotiators can actually help him understand how to control the situ
border. citizens in the southern part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)